Sweet liking, novelty seeking, and gender predict alcoholic status.

@article{KampovPolevoy2004SweetLN,
  title={Sweet liking, novelty seeking, and gender predict alcoholic status.},
  author={Alexey B. Kampov-Polevoy and Christian Eick and Gerard M. Boland and Elena Khalitov and Fulton T Crews},
  journal={Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research},
  year={2004},
  volume={28 9},
  pages={
          1291-8
        }
}
BACKGROUND The relationship between a hedonic response to sweet taste and a propensity to excessive alcohol drinking is supported by both animal and human studies. There is evidence indicating that the tendency to rate more concentrated sweet solutions as the most pleasurable (i.e., sweet liking) is associated with the genetic vulnerability to alcoholism. However, sweet liking by itself is insufficient to predict the alcoholic status of the individual. Our previous study indicated that… CONTINUE READING

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