Sweet Preference, Sugar Addiction and the Familial History of Alcohol Dependence: Shared Neural Pathways and Genes

@article{Fortuna2010SweetPS,
  title={Sweet Preference, Sugar Addiction and the Familial History of Alcohol Dependence: Shared Neural Pathways and Genes},
  author={Jeffrey L Fortuna},
  journal={Journal of Psychoactive Drugs},
  year={2010},
  volume={42},
  pages={147 - 151}
}
  • Jeffrey L Fortuna
  • Published 1 June 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
Abstract Contemporary research has shown that a high number of alcohol-dependent and other drug-dependent individuals have a sweet preference, specifically for foods with a high sucrose concentration. Moreover, both human and animal studies have demonstrated that in some brains the consumption of sugar-rich foods or drinks primes the release of euphoric endorphins and dopamine within the nucleus accumbens, in a manner similar to some drugs of abuse. The neurobiological pathways of drug and… Expand
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