Swearing as a response to pain

@article{Stephens2009SwearingAA,
  title={Swearing as a response to pain},
  author={Richard Stephens and J. B. Atkins and and Ann E. Kingston},
  journal={NeuroReport},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={1056-1060}
}
Although a common pain response, whether swearing alters individuals' experience of pain has not been investigated. This study investigated whether swearing affects cold-pressor pain tolerance (the ability to withstand immersing the hand in icy water), pain perception and heart rate. In a repeated measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to repeat a swear word versus a neutral word. In addition, sex differences and the roles of pain catastrophising, fear of pain and… Expand
Swearing as a response to pain-effect of daily swearing frequency.
TLDR
The higher the daily swearing frequency, the less was the benefit for pain tolerance when swearing, compared with when not swearing, and the underlying mechanism by which swearing increases pain tolerance is the provocation of an emotional response. Expand
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Data indicate that people become more pain tolerant with raised state aggression and support the theory that raised pain tolerance from swearing occurs via an emotional response. Expand
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Methods for alleviating physical pain are increasingly found to attenuate social pain. Recent evidence suggests that swearing may attenuate sensitivity to physical pain. This study examined whetherExpand
Means ( SDs ) of Age , Cold Pressor Latency , Perceived Pain Scale Score , Resting
1274 Abstract: Previously we showed that swearing produces a pain lessening (hypoalgesic) effect for many people. This paper assesses whether habituation to swearing occurs such that people who swearExpand
Swearing as a response to pain: A cross-cultural comparison of British and Japanese participants
TLDR
The results replicate previous findings that swearing increases pain tolerance and that individuals from an Asian ethnic background experience greater levels of perceived pain than those from a Caucasian ethnic background, but do not support the idea of pain perception modification due to a “scripting” effect. Expand
Swearing as a Response to Pain: Assessing Hypoalgesic Effects of Novel “Swear” Words
TLDR
Findings that repeating a swear word at a steady pace and volume benefits pain tolerance are replicated, extending this finding to pain threshold. Expand
Verbal Swearing Attenuates the Effects of Social Pain
• Swearing increases physical pain tolerance (Stephens, Atkins, & Kingston, 2009) Swearing can act as an adaptive response to physical pain, decreasing pain sensitivity and increasing pain tolerance.Expand
Taboo gesticulations as a response to pain
TLDR
These largely null findings further the understanding of swearing as a response to pain, suggesting that the activation of taboo schemas is not sufficient for hypoalgesia to occur. Expand
On the importance of being vocal: saying "ow" improves pain tolerance.
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The results provide first evidence that vocalizing helps individuals cope with pain and suggest that motor more than other processes contribute to this effect. Expand
Increased Pain Communication following Multiple Group Memberships Salience Leads to a Relative Reduction in Pain-Related Brain Activity
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Evidence for an adaptive response to pain is provided: the more people make use of the social resources at their disposal when experiencing pain, the less pain areas are activated. Expand
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