Suture Closure of Subcutaneous Fat and Wound Disruption After Cesarean Delivery: A Meta-Analysis

@article{Chelmow2004SutureCO,
  title={Suture Closure of Subcutaneous Fat and Wound Disruption After Cesarean Delivery: A Meta-Analysis},
  author={David Chelmow and Elisa J Rodriguez and Marielle Sabatini},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={103},
  pages={974-980}
}
OBJECTIVE: To define the role of suture closure of the subcutaneous dead space in preventing wound complications after cesarean delivery. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the bibliographies of major texts and review articles. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: Only studies in which patients undergoing cesarean delivery were randomly assigned to closure of the subcutaneous space or to no closure were included. Each study was required to report on at… 

The association of skin incision placement during cesarean delivery with wound complications in obese women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  • R. McCurdyLaura Felder V. Berghella
  • Medicine
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2020
Vertical incisions may be associated with an increased risk for wound complications compared to transverse incisions for cesarean delivery in obese women, and randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate optimal cESarean skin incision for these women.

Suture Closure versus Non-Closure of Subcutaneous Fat and Cosmetic Outcome after Cesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Suture closure of the subcutaneous fat at CS does not affect long-term cosmetic outcome and there was no difference in duration of surgery, SSI, seroma formation or wound disruption between groups.

A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Wound Complications after a Caesarean Section in Obese Women

Subcutaneous drainage does not reduce the risk of a wound complications, wound infections, and fever in obese women after caesarean sections and negative prophylactic pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce therisk of surgical site infections.

A randomized controlled trial of closure or non-closure of subcutaneous fatty tissue after midline vertical incision

It is found that there are no significant differences in the rate of surgical wound complications with suture approximation of the subcutaneous tissue in patients with 4 cm or more sub cutaneous thickness undergoing gynecologic surgery via a vertical midline incision.

Scar appearance of different skin and subcutaneous tissue closure techniques in caesarean section: a randomized study.

Comparison of Sutured versus Non-Sutured Subcutaneous Fat Tissue in Abdominal Surgery

It is suggested that omission of subcutaneous fat tissue suturing in elective abdominal surgery does not increase the occurrence of infectious or non-infectious wound complications.

Subcutaneous Tissue Reapproximation, Alone or in Combination With Drain, in Obese Women Undergoing Cesarean Delivery

The additional use of a subcutaneous drain along with a standard sub cutaneous suture reapproximation technique is not effective for the prevention of wound complications in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery.

Non-closure of the peritoneum and subcutaneous tissue at radical hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

It is revealed that closure of the peritoneum and subcutaneous tissue provides no immediate postoperative benefits while unnecessarily lengthening surgical time and anesthesia exposure.
...

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