• Corpus ID: 10383060

Sustained Inattentional Blindness: The Role of Location in the Detection of Unexpected Dynamic Events

@article{Most2000SustainedIB,
  title={Sustained Inattentional Blindness: The Role of Location in the Detection of Unexpected Dynamic Events},
  author={Steven B. Most and Daniel J. Simons and Brian J. Scholl and Christopher F. Chabris},
  journal={Psyche},
  year={2000},
  volume={6}
}
Attempts to understand visual attention have produced models based on location, in which attention selects particular regions of space, and models based on other visual attributes (e.g., in which attention selects discrete objects or specific features). Previous studies of inattentional blindness have contributed to our understanding of attention by suggesting that the detection of an unexpected object depends on the distance of that object from the spatial focus of attention. When the distance… 

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