Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

@article{Furby2012SusceptibilityOC,
  title={Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event},
  author={Kathryn A. Furby and Jessica Bouwmeester and Michael L. Berumen},
  journal={Coral Reefs},
  year={2012},
  volume={32},
  pages={505-513}
}
A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10–11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids… Expand

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