Survivorship, growth and reproduction of the non-native Caprella mutica Schurin, 1935 (Crustacea: Amphipoda)

@article{Cook2007SurvivorshipGA,
  title={Survivorship, growth and reproduction of the non-native Caprella mutica Schurin, 1935 (Crustacea: Amphipoda)},
  author={Elizabeth J. Cook and Kathy J Willis and M. Lozano-Fern{\'a}ndez},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2007},
  volume={590},
  pages={55-64}
}
Caprella mutica Schurin is an epifaunal amphipod crustacean which originates in north-east Asia and has spread throughout the world, yet very little is known about fundamental aspects of this species biology. This paper examined the survivorship of C. mutica reared under laboratory conditions at 13–14 °C, 14 h light: 10 h dark photoperiod and fed commercial salmon feed, the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis Reumann and Lewin, the macroalgae, Fucus vesiculosus L. and given no additional feed. In… 

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Distribution of the introduced amphipod, Caprella mutica Schurin, 1935 (Amphipoda: Caprellida: Caprellidae) on the west coast of Scotland and a review of its global distribution

The local scale distribution of C. mutica is potentially limited by the availability of suitable transportation vectors during the dispersal phase rather than by physical environmental factors following release, which suggests that the species has not yet been found in natural habitats.

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