Surviving the Taint of Plagiarism: Nella Larsen's "Sanctuary" and Sheila Kaye-Smith's "Mrs. Adis"

@article{Larson2007SurvivingTT,
  title={Surviving the Taint of Plagiarism: Nella Larsen's "Sanctuary" and Sheila Kaye-Smith's "Mrs. Adis"},
  author={Kelli A. Larson},
  journal={Journal of Modern Literature},
  year={2007},
  volume={30},
  pages={104 - 82}
}
While at the top of her professional career, Nella Larsen became embroiled in an ugly plagiarism controversy, accused of appropriating the work of British writer, Sheila Kaye-Smith. The case involved Larsen's 1930 short story "Sanctuary" and Kaye-Smith's 1922 "Mrs. Adis." Though editors exonerated Larsen, the consequences for her career were devastating; Larsen never published again. Considering the deluge of scholarship available on Larsen's other works, the small quantity of analyses focused… Expand
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