Surviving in a Marine Desert: The Sponge Loop Retains Resources Within Coral Reefs

@article{deGoeij2013SurvivingIA,
  title={Surviving in a Marine Desert: The Sponge Loop Retains Resources Within Coral Reefs},
  author={Jasper M. de Goeij and Dick van Oevelen and Mark J. A. Vermeij and Ronald Osinga and Jack J. Middelburg and Anton F.P.M. de Goeij and Wim Admiraal},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={342},
  pages={108 - 110}
}
Sponge Pump “Darwin's Paradox” asks how productive and diverse ecosystems like coral reefs thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. De Goeij et al. (p. 108) now show that coral reef sponges are part of a highly efficient recycling pathway for dissolved organic matter (DOM), converting it, via rapid sponge-cell turnover, into cellular detritus that becomes food for reef consumers. DOM transfer through the sponge loop approaches the gross primary production rates required for the entire coral… 

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