Survival of rock-colonizing organisms after 1.5 years in outer space.

@article{Onofri2012SurvivalOR,
  title={Survival of rock-colonizing organisms after 1.5 years in outer space.},
  author={Silvano Onofri and Rosa de la Torre and Jean-Pierre Paul de Vera and Sieglinde Ott and Laura Zucconi and Laura Selbmann and Giuliano Scalzi and Kasthuri Venkateswaran and Elke Rabbow and Francisco J S{\'a}nchez I{\~n}igo and Gerda Horneck},
  journal={Astrobiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={12 5},
  pages={
          508-16
        }
}
Cryptoendolithic microbial communities and epilithic lichens have been considered as appropriate candidates for the scenario of lithopanspermia, which proposes a natural interplanetary exchange of organisms by means of rocks that have been impact ejected from their planet of origin. So far, the hardiness of these terrestrial organisms in the severe and hostile conditions of space has not been tested over extended periods of time. A first long-term (1.5 years) exposure experiment in space was… 

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