Survival of patients with stage I lung cancer detected on CT screening.

@article{Henschke2006SurvivalOP,
  title={Survival of patients with stage I lung cancer detected on CT screening.},
  author={Claudia I. Henschke and David F. Yankelevitz and Daniel M. Libby and Mark W. Pasmantier and James P. Smith and Olli S. Miettinen},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={355 17},
  pages={
          1763-71
        }
}
BACKGROUND The outcome among patients with clinical stage I cancer that is detected on annual screening using spiral computed tomography (CT) is unknown. [...] Key MethodMETHODS In a large collaborative study, we screened 31,567 asymptomatic persons at risk for lung cancer using low-dose CT from 1993 through 2005, and from 1994 through 2005, 27,456 repeated screenings were performed 7 to 18 months after the previous screening.Expand
Long-term prognosis of patients with lung cancer detected on low-dose chest computed tomography screening.
TLDR
Results suggest that lung cancers detected on CT screening are mostly curative, and the impact of CT screening on mortality at community level needs to be clarified by monitoring lung cancer deaths. Expand
Radiation therapy for stage I lung cancer detected on computed tomography screening: results from the international early lung cancer action program
TLDR
This is the first study to show outcomes of definitive radiation for stage I NSCLC in a screened population, and although only used in a small number of cases, there is no difference in lung cancer-specific survival when comparing definitive radiation to surgical resection. Expand
How Have We Diagnosed Early-Stage Lung Cancer without Radiographic Screening? A Contemporary Single-Center Experience
TLDR
Significance Symptoms remain a dominant but declining reason for detection of early-stage NSCLC and the proportion of cases detected initially by CT scan without antecedent chest x-ray has increased considerably. Expand
Balancing curability and unnecessary surgery in the context of computed tomography screening for lung cancer.
TLDR
The frequency and extent of surgery for nonmalignant disease can be minimized in a CT screening program and provide a high cure rate for those diagnosed with lung cancer and undergoing surgical resection. Expand
Retrospective review of lung cancers diagnosed in annual rounds of CT screening.
TLDR
Lung cancers found on annual repeat screenings were frequently identified in the previous round of screening, suggesting that review of the varied appearance and incorporation of advanced image display may be useful for earlier detection. Expand
Survival After Detection of Stage I Lung Cancer by Screening in the National Lung Screening Trial.
TLDR
Long-term lung cancer-specific survival of Stage I lung cancer was greater with CT than with CXR screening or in the general population, for smaller primary tumor size, and with surgical treatment. Expand
Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography
TLDR
Evidence from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20 % reduction in mortality from lung cancer in patients undergoing three rounds of LDCT screening, suggesting low-dose computed tomography of the chest has emerged as a promising screening tool. Expand
Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography
Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world, with most patients having a dismal prognosis. As many as 40 % of lung cancers are diagnosed in stage IV, with current 5-yearExpand
Definitive Radiation for Stage I Lung Cancer in a Screened Population: Results From the I-ELCAP.
TLDR
Despite being older and having more comorbidities, LCS long-term survival rates of patients treated with definitive radiation therapy were not significantly different compared with survival rates with surgery alone; radiation therapy appears to be a viable alternative to surgery for screen-diagnosed patients with lung cancer. Expand
Computed tomography screening and lung cancer outcomes.
TLDR
Screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT may increase the rate of lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, but may not meaningfully reduce the risk of advanced lung cancer or death from lung cancer. Expand
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