Survey results of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony losses in China (2010–2013)

@article{Liu2016SurveyRO,
  title={Survey results of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony losses in China (2010–2013)},
  author={Zhiguang Liu and Chao Chen and Qingsheng Niu and Wenzhong Qi and Chunying Yuan and Songkun Su and Shidong Liu and Yingsheng Zhang and Xuewen Zhang and Ting Ji and Rongguo Dai and Zhongyin Zhang and Shunhai Wang and Fu-chao Gao and Haikun Guo and Liping Lv and Guiling Ding and Wei Shi},
  journal={Journal of Apicultural Research},
  year={2016},
  volume={55},
  pages={29 - 37}
}
Survey results of colony losses of honey bee (Apis mellifera) have been reported worldwide in recent years. However, there has previously been no large-scale survey reported for China, the largest beekeeping country. Here we present the result of a three-year survey from 2010 to 2013, using the standard COLOSS questionnaires. In total, we received 3,090 responses, including 485 from part-time beekeepers, 2,216 from sideline beekeepers, and 389 from commercial beekeepers. Colony losses were low… Expand
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