Survey of 2144 Cases of Red‐Back Spider Bites: Australia and New Zealand, 1963‐1976

@article{Sutherland1978SurveyO2,
  title={Survey of 2144 Cases of Red‐Back Spider Bites: Australia and New Zealand, 1963‐1976},
  author={Struan K. Sutherland and John C. Trinca},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={1978},
  volume={2}
}
An analysis has been made of 2144 consecutive cases of latrodectism (envenomation by the redback spider, Latrodectus mactans hasselti) reported to the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories. In the last eight years, notifications have averaged 240 cases per annum. Bites, usually on the extremities (74%), occurred most frequently in the summer months, and in the afternoon or evening. Most victims (79%) were aged between 18 and 50 years and 64.4% of them were males. Males are still often bitten on the… Expand
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