Surgical infections--the general surgeon's perspective. Defining the problem, seeking solutions.

Abstract

Infection has been historically the greatest threat to patients undergoing surgery, but with effective surveillance programs, the risk of surgical infection can be markedly reduced. An effective approach to infection control involves attention to the triad complex of infection--asepsis (keeping bacteria below the "critical inoculum"), antisepsis (disciplined use of antibiotics), and host defense mechanisms (altering factors that reduce immunity). Several large studies indicate a national trend toward decreased wound infection rates. This trend is probably attributable to a wide acceptance of surveillance programs, shorter length of hospitalization, and better use of antibiotic therapy.

Cite this paper

@article{Luke1986SurgicalIG, title={Surgical infections--the general surgeon's perspective. Defining the problem, seeking solutions.}, author={Whitney Luke}, journal={Postgraduate medicine}, year={1986}, volume={80 7}, pages={74-84} }