Surgical decompression of the facial nerve in the treatment of chronic cluster headache.

@article{Solomon1986SurgicalDO,
  title={Surgical decompression of the facial nerve in the treatment of chronic cluster headache.},
  author={S Solomon and Ronald I. Apfelbaum},
  journal={Archives of neurology},
  year={1986},
  volume={43 5},
  pages={
          479-82
        }
}
The nervus intermedius (NI) appears to be the main conduit for the associated symptoms of cluster headache (CH) and perhaps for the pain as well. Subtle injury of the facial nerve and NI might initiate mechanisms responsible for CH. Five patients with chronic CH unresponsive to medication underwent surgical decompression of the root exit-entry zone of the facial nerve, and in two patients the trigeminal nerve root was also decompressed. In two patients, the pain syndrome was markedly relieved… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
The current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed, and particularly the pros and cons of SCS and ONS.
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TLDR
Preliminary results indicate a role for posterior hypothalamic stimulation, which was demonstrated to be safe and effective, in the treatment of drug-resistant chronic CHs, and point to a central pathogenesis for chronicCHs.
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TLDR
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Stimulation of the Posterior Hypothalamus for Treatment of Chronic Intractable Cluster Headaches: First Reported Series
TLDR
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Trigeminal Nerve Radiosurgical Treatment In Intractable Chronic Clusterheadache: Unexpected High Toxicity.
TLDR
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