Surface Ices and the Atmospheric Composition of Pluto

@article{Owen1993SurfaceIA,
  title={Surface Ices and the Atmospheric Composition of Pluto},
  author={Tobias C. Owen and Ted L. Roush and Dale P. Cruikshank and James L. Elliot and Leslie A. Young and Catherine de Bergh and Bernard Schmitt and T. R. Geballe and Robert H. Brown and Mary Jane Bartholomew},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={261},
  pages={745 - 748}
}
Observations of the 1.4- to 2.4-micrometer spectrum of Pluto reveal absorptions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen ices and confirm the presence of solid methane. Frozen nitrogen is more abundant than the other two ices by a factor of about 50; gaseous nitrogen must therefore be the major atmospheric constituent. The absence of carbon dioxide absorptions is one of several differences between the spectra of Pluto and Triton in this region. Both worlds carry information about the composition of the… 
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The 3 March 1987 Charon occultation by Pluto was observed in the infrared at 1.7, 2.0, and 2.35 micrometers, and measurements suggest the existence of water ice on Pluto's moon.
Ices on the Surface of Triton
TLDR
The near-infrared spectrum of Triton reveals ices of nitrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, of which nitrogen is the dominant component, which challenges existing models of methane and nitrogen photochemistry on Tritons.
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