Suppression of visible persistence in apparent motion

@article{Hogben1985SuppressionOV,
  title={Suppression of visible persistence in apparent motion},
  author={John H. Hogben and Vincent Di Lollo},
  journal={Perception & Psychophysics},
  year={1985},
  volume={38},
  pages={450-460}
}
Moving stimuli produce less smear than would be expected on the basis of visible persistence lasting 100–150 msec. Two experiments examined the duration of smear as a function of background luminance, target velocity, and duration of the display. It was found that smear decreased as background luminance increased, smear increased with velocity, and, as display duration increased from 10 to 160 msec, duration of smear first increased and then decreased. Alternative explanations of the results… CONTINUE READING

Figures and Topics from this paper.

Explore Further: Topics Discussed in This Paper

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 CITATIONS

Motion-Based Analysis of Spatial Patterns by the Human Visual System

  • Current Biology
  • 2004
VIEW 10 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

A target in real motion appears blurred in the absence of other proximal moving targets

VIEW 10 EXCERPTS
CITES METHODS, BACKGROUND & RESULTS
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Stroboscopic effect: contrast threshold function and dependence on illumination level.

  • Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics, image science, and vision
  • 2018
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES

Motion smear

D. BURR
  • Nature, 284, 164-165.
  • 1980
VIEW 9 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Phenomenal simutaneity and the perceptual moment hypothesis.

  • British journal of psychology
  • 1968
VIEW 7 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Temporal and spatial summation in human vision at different background intensities

H. B. BARLOW
  • Journal ofPhysiology, 141, 337-350.
  • 1958
VIEW 10 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Visible persistence of moving objects.

  • Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
  • 1984
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS