Suppression of Niacin‐induced Vasodilation with an Antagonist to Prostaglandin D2 Receptor Subtype 1

@article{Lai2007SuppressionON,
  title={Suppression of Niacin‐induced Vasodilation with an Antagonist to Prostaglandin D2 Receptor Subtype 1},
  author={Eseng Lai and Inge de Lepeleire and T M Crumley and F Liu and Larissa A. Wenning and Nicole Michiels and Eva Vets and Gary P. O'neill and John A. Wagner and Kg Gottesdiener},
  journal={Clinical Pharmacology \& Therapeutics},
  year={2007},
  volume={81}
}
Niacin (nicotinic acid) reduces cardiovascular events in patients with dyslipidemia. However, symptoms associated with niacin‐induced vasodilation (e.g., flushing) have limited its use. Laropiprant is a selective antagonist of the prostaglandin D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1), which may mediate niacin‐induced vasodilation. The aim of this proof‐of‐concept study was to evaluate the effects of laropiprant (vs placebo) on niacin‐induced cutaneous vasodilation. Coadministration of laropiprant 30, 100… Expand
Effects of Aspirin When Added to the Prostaglandin D2 Receptor Antagonist Laropiprant on Niacin‐Induced Flushing Symptoms
TLDR
The overall incidence and severity of flushing were comparable for participants receiving aspirin or placebo before ER niacin 2 g/laropiprant 40 mg and the difference in 3‐day average OSSS between treatments was 0.2 (P = .180). Expand
Extended-release niacin/laropiprant: reducing niacin-induced flushing to better realize the benefit of niacin in improving cardiovascular risk factors.
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TLDR
It is unlikely that any chronic lowering of BP by niacin is due to dilation of dermal vessels through activation of the DP1 receptor by PGD2, but post hoc analyses of some of the more recent nacin clinical trials also support a more chronic, dose‐dependent, BP‐lowering effect of niacIn. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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