Suppression and Elimination of an Island Population of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus with Sterile Males

@article{Patterson1970SuppressionAE,
  title={Suppression and Elimination of an Island Population of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus with Sterile Males},
  author={Richard S. Patterson and Donald E. Weidhaas and HUGH R. Ford and Clifford S. Lofgren},
  journal={Science},
  year={1970},
  volume={168},
  pages={1368 - 1369}
}
The release of 8,400 to 18,000 males per day of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say which had been exposed to a sterilizing agent (thiotepa), suppressed and eliminated an indigenous population of this mosquito on an island off the coast of Florida in a 10-week period. Sterile males were effective in seeking out and mating with females on the island. 

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We thank Drs. Roger Guillemin and Andrew