Suppressing Unwanted Memories

@article{Anderson2009SuppressingUM,
  title={Suppressing Unwanted Memories},
  author={Michael C. Anderson and Benjamin J. Levy},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={18},
  pages={189 - 194}
}
When reminded of something we would prefer not to think about, we often try to exclude the unwanted memory from awareness. Recent research indicates that people control unwanted memories by stopping memory retrieval, using mechanisms similar to those used to stop reflexive motor responses. Controlling unwanted memories is implemented by the lateral prefrontal cortex, which acts to reduce activity in the hippocampus, thereby impairing retention of those memories. Individual differences in the… Expand

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