Supportive interactions, negative interactions, and depressed mood

@article{Schuster1990SupportiveIN,
  title={Supportive interactions, negative interactions, and depressed mood},
  author={Tonya L. Schuster and Ronald C. Kessler and Robert Aseltine},
  journal={American Journal of Community Psychology},
  year={1990},
  volume={18},
  pages={423-438}
}
Research on the association between social relationships and emotional functioning has emphasized the health-promoting effects of social support. Yet there is reason to believe that the absence of negative social interactions may be more important for mental health than the presence of supportive interactions. In this investigation we clarify important characteristics concerning the source, the recipient, and the combined influence of support and negativity. Data are presented regarding… 
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  • 2008
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Results indicated that negative aspects of close relationships played a comparatively stronger role than positive aspects in their associations with both psychological distress and well-being.
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The findings indicate that negative illness-related network interactions are associated with decreases in depressive mood, as indicated by scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D).
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Although research has historically focused on the positive aspects of social ties, relationships inevitably involve a combination of positive as well as negative interactions. For the present study,
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To understand the effects of social exchanges, it is important to consider the context of life events, and the Domain Specific Model resulted in the best fit.
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Investigated both positive and negative social interactions and their effect on mental health for 106 individuals caring for a seriously mentally ill family member and showed that under conditions of high negative interaction, the relationship between demand and distress was intensified.
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This model explains both the positive and negative effects that social relationships have on the well-being of depressed individuals and forms a major tenet of a model that integrates previous models of social support mechanisms, namely, the buffering hypothesis and the main effects hypothesis.
Reciprocal Effects Between Health and Social Support in Older Adults’ Relationships With Their Children and Friends
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The findings suggest that older adults’ poor health has a negative impact on their social relationships and that such effect surpasses the impact of social relationships on health.
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