Support for mending the matrix: resource seeking by butterflies in apparent non-resource zones

@article{Dennis2006SupportFM,
  title={Support for mending the matrix: resource seeking by butterflies in apparent non-resource zones},
  author={Roger L. H. Dennis and Peter B. Hardy},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={157-168}
}
  • R. Dennis, P. Hardy
  • Published 22 March 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Insect Conservation
In conserving organisms, a bipolar view has generally been adopted of landscapes, in which resources are allocated to patches of habitats and the matrix ignored. Allocating additional resources to the matrix would depend on two conditions: first, that organisms search for resources in landscapes regardless of differences in vegetation types and resource availability; second, that when resources occur in the matrix they are used by species. Behavioural data linked to biotope and substrate types… 
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