Supplementing copper at the upper level of the adult dietary recommended intake induces detectable but transient changes in healthy adults.

@article{Araya2005SupplementingCA,
  title={Supplementing copper at the upper level of the adult dietary recommended intake induces detectable but transient changes in healthy adults.},
  author={Magdalena Araya and Manuel Olivares and Fernando Pizarro and Marco A. M{\'e}ndez and Mauricio Gonz{\'a}lez and Ricardo Uauy},
  journal={The Journal of nutrition},
  year={2005},
  volume={135 10},
  pages={
          2367-71
        }
}
The health consequences of mild copper excess in humans are unknown. In a previous study, 2 mo of supplementation with up to 6 mg Cu/L in drinking water did not induce detectable changes. Here we assessed a copper supplement at the upper level of dietary recommendations for "healthy" adults. The study was a prospective controlled trial; participants (women and men, 18-50 y old), represented the upper and lower 5% of the ceruloplasmin distribution curve obtained from a community-based sample of… 

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