Superstitious observations: fortune-telling in English folk culture

@article{Harte2018SuperstitiousOF,
  title={Superstitious observations: fortune-telling in English folk culture},
  author={J. Harte},
  journal={Time and Mind},
  year={2018},
  volume={11},
  pages={67 - 88}
}
  • J. Harte
  • Published 2018
  • History
  • Time and Mind
ABSTRACT Magic and divination were dismissed by the Victorian elite as the ignorant beliefs of a socially backward underclass. But a more nuanced approach would ask how magical thought worked in practice. Superstitions were not simply mistaken beliefs, but indicated an alternative universe of interpretation, one in which working-class people took refuge under the strain of misfortunes which would have been too bleak to contemplate in rationally objective terms. The less control that people had… Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
The Trumpet-Major
  • 11
The Making of the English Working Class
  • 1,798
The Magical Imagination: Magic and Modernity in Urban England, 1780-1914
  • 17
‘A Terrific Ogre’: The Role of the Devil in Victorian Popular Belief
  • 2
The Penguin Guide to the Superstitions of Britain and Ireland
  • 20
Newspapers and the Popular Belief in Witchcraft and Magic in the Modern Period
  • 20
The Golden Bough: a Study in Magic and Religion
  • 553
  • Highly Influential
The Wise Man and His Community
  • 10
A Dictionary of Superstitions
  • 53
...
1
2
3
4
5
...