Supernatural believers attribute more intentions to random movement than skeptics: An fMRI study

@article{Riekki2014SupernaturalBA,
  title={Supernatural believers attribute more intentions to random movement than skeptics: An fMRI study},
  author={T. Riekki and M. Lindeman and T. Raij},
  journal={Social Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={9},
  pages={400 - 411}
}
  • T. Riekki, M. Lindeman, T. Raij
  • Published 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Social Neuroscience
  • A host of research has attempted to explain why some believe in the supernatural and some do not. One suggested explanation for commonly held supernatural beliefs is that they are a by-product of theory of mind (ToM) processing. However, this does not explain why skeptics with intact ToM processes do not believe. We employed fMRI to investigate activation differences in ToM-related brain circuitries between supernatural believers (N = 12) and skeptics (N = 11) while they watched 2D animations… CONTINUE READING
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