Superior parietal cortices and varieties of mental rotation

@article{Parsons2003SuperiorPC,
  title={Superior parietal cortices and varieties of mental rotation},
  author={Lawrence M. Parsons},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={515-517}
}
  • L. Parsons
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences

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