Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Where Do We Stand Today?

@article{Lee2012SuperiorMA,
  title={Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Where Do We Stand Today?},
  author={Tae Hee Lee and Joon Seong Lee and Yun ju Jo and Kyung Sik Park and Jae Hee Cheon and Yong Sung Kim and Jae Young Jang and Young Woo Kang},
  journal={Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery},
  year={2012},
  volume={16},
  pages={2203-2211}
}
BackgroundMost data on large studies of superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) were published over 30 years ago. [...] Key Method From January 2000 to December 2009, 80 cases (53 females, median age 28 years) of SMAS were collected retrospectively from seven university hospitals in South Korea.ResultsThe median body mass index at diagnosis was 17.4 kg/m2, with a range of 10–22.1.Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: A Worldwide Descriptive Study with Literature Review
TLDR
D diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome is established after a thorough assessment of the clinical presentations and confirmed with suitable imaging modalities, and the choice of treatment should be dependent on the causes and severity as different patients respond differently to therapy. Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: a Prospective Study in a Single Institution
TLDR
Barium swallow at 2 months postoperatively showed an improvement in terms of gastroduodenal dilation and emptying in 38% of patients with preoperative pathological findings, suggesting SMAS is a rare condition that should be suspected in cases of chronic, refractory upper digestive symptoms, particularly in females with low BMIs. Expand
Predictors of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Evidence from a Case-Control Study
TLDR
There was a significant reduction in the aortomesenteric angle and distance of the SMA patients as compared to both patients having acute and chronic abdominal pain and the BMI of patients was positively correlated to aortonsenteric angles and distance to the moderate level. Expand
Optimal Duration of Medical Treatment in Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in Children
TLDR
Children with SMAS should be treated medically for at least 6 weeks before surgical treatment is considered, and a time limit of >6 weeks for the duration of medical management tended to be associated with worse outcomes. Expand
Laparoscopic options in superior mesenteric artery syndrome in children: systematic review
TLDR
The preferred laparoscopic approach is duodenojejunostomy, which can provide definitive relief of the obstruction with minor complications and low recurrence, which is uncommon in children. Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Improved by Enteral Nutritional Therapy: A Retrospective Case-Series Study in a Single Institution
TLDR
EN therapy may be an effective option for Superior mesenteric artery syndrome patients, while it might not remove all symptoms, it can improve the nutritional status to support subsequent treatments. Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Past and Present
TLDR
Therapy of SMAS includes weight gain to increase the aortomesenteric angle, but surgery is indicated in symptomatic patients when conservative management failed, and laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy seems to be a first-choice surgical options. Expand
Superior mesenteric artery (Wilkie’s) syndrome: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal system obstruction
TLDR
SMAS should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of the patients with unsubstantiated symptoms of persistent nausea, emesis, and significant weight loss, and the diagnosis of SMAS is often delayed. Expand
Minimally invasive duodenojejunostomy for superior mesenteric artery syndrome: a case series and review of the literature
TLDR
In well-selected patients, minimally invasive duodenojejunostomy is a safe and effective treatment for SMAS with excellent short-term outcomes. Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Weight Loss Can Be a Problem, Weight Gain Can Be a Solution
TLDR
This acute presentation of a 17-year-old female with nausea, vomiting, and intense epigastric pain is rare but life-threatening due to the possibility of gastric rupture. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in Children: A 20-Year Experience
TLDR
Analyzing the clinical characteristics, means of diagnosis and management of Superior mesenteric artery syndrome in a pediatric population found that SMAS usually presents more acutely than chronically with symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Expand
Superior mesenteric artery syndrome: diagnosis and treatment from the gastroenterologist's view
TLDR
Two young patients with a longstanding history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, and voluminous vomiting were diagnosed with Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS), and treated conservatively by providing enteral or parenteral high caloric nutrition. Expand
The Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in Patients with Spinal Deformity
TLDR
Postoperative weight loss appears to be more important for the development of theSMAS than asthenic body type, and newer derotation/translation corrective techniques have not eliminated the SMAS. Expand
Superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A follow-up study of 16 operated patients.
TLDR
The most striking features in the production of the "pincher mechanism" of the duodenum were found to be a short aortomesenteric distance together with sagittal parallelism between aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Expand
Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies
TLDR
SMA syndrome is a well-described entity which must be considered as a cause of vomiting associated with significant weight loss in young adults and Surgical treatment should be allied with psychological assessment to treat any underlying psychosocial abnormality. Expand
Superior mesenteric artery compression syndrome.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that in two patients gastrojejunostomy failed to relieve the obstruction and one of them had to be reoperated on and a duodenojejunostom performed with relief of obstructive symptoms. Expand
Late superior mesenteric artery syndrome in paraplegia: case report and review
TLDR
SMA syndrome is an unusual gastro-intestinal complication that may occur in paraplegic patients, even late after injury, and Conservative management includes early correction of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance, insertion of a nasojejunal tube beyond the obstruction and renutrition. Expand
[A case of superior mesenteric artery syndrome caused by anorexia nervosa].
TLDR
This case shows that SMA syndrome is an unusual gastrointestinal complication that may occur in patients with anorexia nervosa, and should be treated with total parental nutrition and psychiatric treatment. Expand
Superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Diagnostic criteria and therapeutic approaches.
TLDR
The hospital records and radiographs of 44 patients diagnosed as having superior mesenteric artery syndrome were reviewed using strict clinical and radiographic criteria, suggesting over-diagnosis of the disorder. Expand
Laparoscopic Duodenojejunostomy for Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome
TLDR
Laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy seems to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with SMA syndrome, but more data is required to recommend this operative option as the standard of care. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...