Superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic plant surfaces: an inspiration for biomimetic materials

@article{Koch2009SuperhydrophobicAS,
  title={Superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic plant surfaces: an inspiration for biomimetic materials},
  author={Kerstin Koch and Wilhelm Barthlott},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={367},
  pages={1487 - 1509}
}
  • K. Koch, W. Barthlott
  • Published 28 April 2009
  • Materials Science, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
The diversity of plant surface structures, evolved over 460 million years, has led to a large variety of highly adapted functional structures. The plant cuticle provides structural and chemical modifications for surface wetting, ranging from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. In this paper, the structural basics of superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic plant surfaces and their biological functions are introduced. Wetting in plants is influenced by the sculptures of the cells and by the fine… 
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