Sunburn, sunscreens, and phenotypes: some risk factors for cutaneous melanoma in southern Brazil

@article{Bakos2002SunburnSA,
  title={Sunburn, sunscreens, and phenotypes: some risk factors for cutaneous melanoma in southern Brazil},
  author={L{\'u}cio Bakos and Mario Wagner and Renato Marchiori Bakos and C S Leite and Cristina L. Sperhacke and Karina S Dzekaniak and Ana Luiza Gleisner},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2002},
  volume={41}
}
Background The risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma have been studied in populations from numerous countries around the world. There are no published studies on the risk factors for this malignancy in Brazil, the largest country in South America. 
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TLDR
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This meta-analysis of 18 casecontrol studies found no good evidence for an increased risk for melanoma with sunscreen use, and the strength and the consistency of the observed associations between melanoma and sunscreen use were examined. Expand
Meta-analysis of risk factors for cutaneous melanoma: II. Sun exposure.
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