Summoning compassion to address the challenges of conservation

@article{Wallach2018SummoningCT,
  title={Summoning compassion to address the challenges of conservation},
  author={Arian D. Wallach and Marc Bekoff and Chelsea Batavia and Michael Paul Nelson and Daniel Ramp},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={2018},
  volume={32},
  pages={1255–1265}
}
Conservation practice is informed by science, but it also reflects ethical beliefs about how humanity ought to value and interact with Earth's biota. As human activities continue to drive extinctions and diminish critical life-sustaining ecosystem processes, achieving conservation goals becomes increasingly urgent. However, the determination to react decisively can drive conservationists to handle complex challenges without due deliberation, particularly when wildlife individuals are sacrificed… 

Tables and Topics from this paper

Consequences Matter: Compassion in Conservation Means Caring for Individuals, Populations and Species
TLDR
It is argued that conservationists increasingly seek to adhere to high standards of welfare, and that the extreme position advocated by some supporters of ‘Compassionate Conservation’, rooted in virtue ethics, would, if widely accepted, lead to considerable negative effects for conservation.
Bridging compassion and justice in conservation ethics
Abstract ‘Traditional conservation’ customarily engages in the dismissal of individual non-human animal claims when these conflict with human interests or prevailing ideas of biodiversity. Emerging
Recognizing animal personhood in compassionate conservation
TLDR
Embracing compassion can help dismantle human exceptionalism, recognize nonhuman personhood, and navigate a more expansive moral space.
Envisioning the future with ‘compassionate conservation’: An ominous projection for native wildlife and biodiversity
Abstract The ‘Compassionate Conservation’ movement is gaining momentum through its promotion of ‘ethical’ conservation practices based on self-proclaimed principles of ‘first-do-no-harm’ and
Emotion as a source of moral understanding in conservation.
TLDR
Conservationists should accept that emotions like compassion provide insights that can help them understand and navigate their moral lives, and emotion in general should be affirmed and embraced by conservationists for the novel and essential insights they contribute to conservation ethics.
Compassionate versus consequentialist conservation.
TLDR
This work argues that overabundant wild herbivores should in many cases be managed through consumptive in situ killing to minimize harms while achieving conservation goals, and encourages conservation stakeholders to consider animal welfare consequentialism as an ethical approach.
Compassionate Conservation Clashes With Conservation Biology: Should Empathy, Compassion, and Deontological Moral Principles Drive Conservation Practice?
TLDR
It is argued that the authors' emotional systems have not evolved to provide a reliable basis for making decisions as to how best to ensure the long-term persistence of their planet and the Compassionate Conservation philosophy should not be enshrined as a legalized guiding principle for conservation action.
I Am a Compassionate Conservation Welfare Scientist: Considering the Theoretical and Practical Differences Between Compassionate Conservation and Conservation Welfare
  • N. Beausoleil
  • Medicine, Sociology
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI
  • 2020
TLDR
The purpose of this essay is to highlight the commonalities between these disciplines and to consider key differences, in order to stimulate discussion among interested parties and use the authors' collective expertise and energy to best effect.
A critical review of the compassionate conservation debate.
TLDR
The debate to characterize compassionate conservation and to philosophically analyze critiques that are recurring and that warrant further critical attention is reviewed to provide a clearer basis for crucial ongoing interdisciplinary dialogue about ethics, values, and conservation.
Conservationists’ moral obligations toward wildlife: Values and identity promote conservation conflict
Abstract Recent debate among scholars reveals potential rifts in the conservation community concerning the moral bases of conservation, and the nature of humanity’s obligations to nature. We reasoned
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 70 REFERENCES
Compassion as a Practical and Evolved Ethic for Conservation
The ethical position underpinning decision making is an important concern for conservation biologists when setting priorities for interventions. The recent debate on how best to protect nature has
Bringing Compassion to the Ethical Dilemma in Killing Kangaroos for Conservation
  • D. Ramp
  • Political Science, Medicine
    Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
  • 2013
TLDR
It is argued that efforts to bring transparency and objectivity to the public debate have to date been obfuscated by those seeking to maintain entrenched interests.
Emotions and the Ethics of Consequence in Conservation Decisions: Lessons from Cecil the Lion
Though the conservation community has long premised its moral foundations on consequentialist thinking and has embraced a dualistic worldview severing reason from emotion, the conservation community
International consensus principles for ethical wildlife control.
TLDR
These principles for ethical wildlife control should guide development of international, national, and local standards and control decisions and implementation and be based on the specifics of the situation rather than negative labels applied to the target species.
For goodness sake! What is intrinsic value and why should we care?
Abstract In recent years, conservation planning, policy, and communications have increasingly emphasized the human benefits, or “ecosystem services,” provided by nonhuman nature. In response to this
Grieving for the Past and Hoping for the Future: Balancing Polarizing Perspectives in Conservation and Restoration
I consider the possibility that people engaged in conservation and management of species and ecosystems are experiencing grief related to ongoing loss of species, assemblages, ecosystem integrity,
Ethics and Responsibility in Wildlife Tourism: Lessons from Compassionate Conservation in the Anthropocene
Whether captive or non-captive, consumptive or non-consumptive, targeted or non-targeted, guided or non-guided, wildlife tourism activities have traditionally been dominated by an anthropocentric
Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine
  • M. Bekoff
  • Geography, Medicine
    Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
  • 2013
TLDR
There are some animals about whom the authors know little or nothing and that knowledge about their behavior and lifehistory patterns will help to save them from further decimation or extinction, so individuals will have to be studied in captivity.
What are 60 warblers worth? Killing in the name of conservation
TLDR
It is argued that compliance with animal research regulations, while important, inadequately accommodates the ethical aspects of animal research, and individual ecologists ought to understand themselves what does and does not represent sound and valid arguments for ethical decisions.
Shifting public values and what they mean for increasing democracy in wildlife management decisions
Over the last century, changing public attitudes about the value of wildlife have triggered substantial changes in species management that have both benefited and hindered conservation efforts.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...