Corpus ID: 235311032

Summary of Talk Given at the Conference “Immateriality, Thinking, and the Self in the Long Middle Ages”

@inproceedings{Oelze2015SummaryOT,
  title={Summary of Talk Given at the Conference “Immateriality, Thinking, and the Self in the Long Middle Ages”},
  author={Anselm Oelze},
  year={2015}
}
Introductory Remarks Medieval theories of animal cognition by and large start from the assumption that only human animals are endowed with intellect (intellectus) and reason (ratio). That is, according to the standard medieval view, dogs, cats, donkeys, and other nonhuman animals have souls, yet their souls are not immaterial intellectual souls but material sensory souls (including usually five external senses as well as a number of so-called internal senses, e.g., common sense, imagination… Expand