Sumatriptan for prevention of acute mountain sickness: randomized clinical trial

@article{Jafarian2007SumatriptanFP,
  title={Sumatriptan for prevention of acute mountain sickness: randomized clinical trial},
  author={Sirous Jafarian and Farzam Gorouhi and Shabnam Salimi and Jamshid Lotfi},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2007},
  volume={62}
}
To determine the impact of sumatriptan prophylaxis on acute mountain sickness (AMS) and altitude headache development within 24 hours of ascent, we designed a double‐blind, randomized, clinical trial. 
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This chapter summarises advances made over the last 12 years regarding our understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical implications in acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude
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  • Medicine
    Travel medicine and infectious disease
  • 2014
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TLDR
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TLDR
These findings argue against sustained trigeminovascular system activation as a significant event in acute mountain sickness.
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TLDR
The clinical effectiveness and adverse events of five of the less commonly used pharmacological interventions for preventing acute HAI in participants who are at risk of developing high altitude illness in any setting are assessed.
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TLDR
Adequate acclimatization via controlled ascent remains the most important factor in preventing altitude illness, although prophylactic pharmacotherapy also may be useful.
Acute mountain sickness: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment.
TLDR
The setting and clinical features of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema are described, including an overview of the known pathophysiology, and contemporary practices for both prevention and treatment are explained exploring the comprehensive evidence base for the various interventions.
High-altitude headache and acute mountain sickness.
TLDR
Symptom escalation seems to be present along the continuum containing HAH, AMS, and high-altitude cerebral oedema.
Impact of Study Design on Reported Incidences of Acute Mountain Sickness: A Systematic Review.
TLDR
Reported incidences and identifiable predictive factors of AMS depend on study design, and associations between predictive factors and AMS incidence were sought through bivariate and multivariate analyses for different study designs separately.
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