Suitability and Sufficiency of Telehealth Clinician-Observed, Participant-Collected Samples for SARS-CoV-2 Testing: The iCollect Cohort Pilot Study

@article{Guest2020SuitabilityAS,
  title={Suitability and Sufficiency of Telehealth Clinician-Observed, Participant-Collected Samples for SARS-CoV-2 Testing: The iCollect Cohort Pilot Study},
  author={Jodie Lynn Guest and Patrick Sean Sullivan and Mariah Valentine-Graves and Rachel Valencia and Elizabeth Adam and Nicole Luisi and Mariko Nakano and Jeannette Guarner and Carlos del Rio and Charles Sailey and Zoe Goedecke and Aaron Julius Siegler and Travis Howard Sanchez},
  journal={JMIR Public Health and Surveillance},
  year={2020},
  volume={6}
}
Background The severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic calls for expanded opportunities for testing, including novel testing strategies such as home-collected specimens. Objective We aimed to understand whether oropharyngeal swab (OPS), saliva, and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens collected by participants at home and mailed to a laboratory were sufficient for use in diagnostic and serology tests of SARS-CoV-2. Methods Eligible participants consented online and were mailed… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

At-home self-collection of saliva, oropharyngeal swabs and dried blood spots for SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis and serology: post-collection acceptability of specimen collection process and patient confidence in specimens

Self-collection of specimens for SARS-CoV-2 testing and preparing and shipping specimens for analysis were acceptable in a diverse group of US adults, and there were no differences in acceptability for any specimen type, packing and shipping, or confidence in samples.

At-home self-collection of saliva, oropharyngeal swabs and dried blood spots for SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis and serology: Post-collection acceptability of specimen collection process and patient confidence in specimens

Self-collection of specimens for SARS-CoV-2 testing, and preparing and shipping specimens for analysis, were acceptable in a diverse group of US adults.

Self-collected nasopharyngeal swab and molecular test using pool testing as strategies to detect severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): feasibility in medical students at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2021.

The strategies that were investigated proved to be economically feasible and valid for the research on SARS-CoV-2 in epidemiological surveys and the cost of molecular testing (RT-PCR), by pool testing, with samples obtained by self-collection was about ten times lower than the usual methods.

Performance of saline and water gargling for SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcriptase PCR testing: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The results supported the use of gargling as a sampling approach for SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR testing, which achieved a high sensitivity for both diagnosis and viral shedding monitoring purposes, and suggested potential differential performance in factors including the nature, sterility and volume of Gargling medium, and duration of gargle, which need further exploration.

Evaluation of dried blood spots as alternative sampling material for serological detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using established ELISAs

DBS have a potential to facilitate efficient community- and population-based screening in the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and ELISA results derived from DBS showed very high agreement to those obtained with serum, supposing adequate usability and robustness of DBS as sample material for detection of anti-SARS- CoV- 2 antibodies.

Saliva as an alternative specimen to nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 diagnosis: Review

The aim of this review was to analyse the recent literature to assess the viability of saliva in COVID-19 diagnosis and hypothesize that the discrepancies in the current literature are likely due to the variations in the saliva collection and processing protocols used between studies.

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Upper Airway Swab Collection for Detection of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens by Individuals or Caregivers Compared to Health Care Workers

Self- and caregiver-collection of upper airway swabs had reassuring diagnostic performance for multiple pathogens and there are numerous potential benefits of self- and caregivers-collected swabs for patients, families, researchers, and health systems.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 40 REFERENCES

Detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and Antibodies in Diverse Samples: Protocol to Validate the Sufficiency of Provider-Observed, Home-Collected Blood, Saliva, and Oropharyngeal Samples

Defining a conceptual framework for assessing the sufficiency of patient-collected samples for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and serologic responses to infection is critical for facilitating public health responses and providing PPE-sparing options to increase testing.

Saliva is a reliable tool to detect SARS-CoV-2

Patients Can Accurately Perform Their Own Rapid HIV Point-of-Care Test in the Emergency Department.

Evaluated patients recruited to perform a rapid POC HIV oral fluid at The Johns Hopkins ED in conjunction with the standard-of-care HIV POC test believed the veracity of their results, and a greater number of patients preferred self-testing.

Accuracy and User-Acceptability of HIV Self-Testing Using an Oral Fluid-Based HIV Rapid Test

Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives, and Incorrectly identifying model results as invalid was a major reason for incorrect result interpretation.

Pilot Evaluation of the Ability of Men Who Have Sex with Men to Self-Administer Rapid HIV Tests, Prepare Dried Blood Spot Cards, and Interpret Test Results, Atlanta, Georgia, 2013

The ability of 22 MSM to conduct two HIV RDTs, interpret sample images of test results, and collect a dried blood spot (DBS) specimen is evaluated.

Will patients "opt in" to perform their own rapid HIV test in the emergency department?

A Finger-Stick Whole-Blood HIV Self-Test as an HIV Screening Tool Adapted to the General Public

The success rate of handling and interpretation of this self-Test “autotest VIH®” is very satisfactory, demonstrating its potential for use by the general public and its utility to increase the number of opportunities to detect HIV patients.

Are Participants in a Street-Based HIV Testing Program Able to Perform Their Own Rapid Test and Interpret the Results?

This is the first study showing that blood-based self-testing with current technology is feasible in HIV-negative participants demanding the test and without prior training or supervision and could be a feasible option to complement current diagnostic strategies.

Alternative HIV Testing Methods among Populations at High Risk for HIV Infection

The low levels of awareness and use ofAlternative HIV tests suggest that the potential for promoting testing among individuals at high risk for HIV by encouraging use of alternative HIV tests has not been fully realized.

Acceptability and intended usage preferences for six HIV testing options among internet-using men who have sex with men

Combination testing packages could enable high risk MSM in putting together annual testing strategies personalized to their circumstances, and warrant due consideration as an element of combination HIV prevention packages.