Suicide-related Internet use: A review

@article{Mok2015SuiciderelatedIU,
  title={Suicide-related Internet use: A review},
  author={K. Mok and Anthony F Jorm and J. Pirkis},
  journal={Australian \& New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2015},
  volume={49},
  pages={697 - 705}
}
Objective: To systematically review research on how people use the Internet for suicide-related reasons and its influence on users. This review summarises the main findings and conclusions of existing work, the nature of studies that have been conducted, their strengths and limitations, and directions for future research. Method: An online search was conducted through PsycINFO, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for papers published between 1991 and 2014. Papers were included if they… Expand

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