Suicide in the media: a quantitative review of studies based on non-fictional stories.

@article{Stack2005SuicideIT,
  title={Suicide in the media: a quantitative review of studies based on non-fictional stories.},
  author={S. Stack},
  journal={Suicide \& life-threatening behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={35 2},
  pages={
          121-33
        }
}
  • S. Stack
  • Published 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Suicide & life-threatening behavior
Research on the effect of suicide stories in the media on suicide in the real world has been marked by much debate and inconsistent findings. Recent narrative reviews have suggested that research based on nonfictional models is more apt to uncover imitative effects than research based on fictional models. There is, however, substantial variation in media effects within the research restricted to nonfictional accounts of suicide. The present analysis provides some explanations of the variation… Expand

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