Sugary beverages represent a threat to global health

@article{Popkin2012SugaryBR,
  title={Sugary beverages represent a threat to global health},
  author={Barry M. Popkin},
  journal={Trends in Endocrinology \& Metabolism},
  year={2012},
  volume={23},
  pages={591-593}
}
  • B. Popkin
  • Published 1 December 2012
  • Medicine
  • Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism
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Toward Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems.
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The presentations addressed the 4 principal domains of sustainability defined as nutrition/health, economics, environment, and society and the ways in which they are represented in current research.
Childhood Obesity and the Consumption of 100 % Fruit Juice: Where Are the Evidence-Based Findings?
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Motivators of and Barriers to Drinking Healthy Beverages among a Sample of Diverse Adults in Bronx, NY
TLDR
Findings suggest that gender and race-specific differences to engaging in drinking water and other healthy beverages exist, and interventions seeking to decrease the consumption of unhealthy beverages among culturally diverse adults may consider gender andRace-specific motivators and barriers associated with this behavior.
Stevia vs. Sucrose: Influence on the Phytochemical Content of a Citrus–Maqui Beverage—A Shelf Life Study
TLDR
New functional beverages, constituting a dietary source of bioactive phenolics and supplemented with stevia or sucrose, were designed in order to study the influence of the sweetener during processing and shelf-life and found stevIA could be considered as an alternative sweetener by the beverage industry.
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