Sugar Content of Popular Sweetened Beverages Based on Objective Laboratory Analysis: Focus on Fructose Content

@article{Ventura2011SugarCO,
  title={Sugar Content of Popular Sweetened Beverages Based on Objective Laboratory Analysis: Focus on Fructose Content},
  author={Emily E. Ventura and Jaimie N. Davis and Michael I Goran},
  journal={Obesity},
  year={2011},
  volume={19}
}
The consumption of fructose, largely in the form of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), has risen over the past several decades and is thought to contribute negatively to metabolic health. However, the fructose content of foods and beverages produced with HFCS is not disclosed and estimates of fructose content are based on the common assumption that the HFCS used contains 55% fructose. The objective of this study was to conduct an objective laboratory analysis of the sugar content and composition… 
Fructose Contents of Various Popular Sweetened Beverages based on Milk Using by HPLC
The global consumption of fructose in the form of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has increased considerably over the past several decades. The current intake of HFCS exceeds that of other major
Response to “Sugar Content of Popular Sweetened Beverages Based on Objective Laboratory Analysis: Focus on Fructose Content”
TLDR
The International Society of Beverage Technologists looked at a series of commercial 42 and 55 HFCS samples which were analyzed by Krueger Food Laboratories, a private contract company and found that if a method selected that was not validated for the detection of maltose or higher sugars the results of an analysis of saccharide distribution would be inaccurate.
Fructose content and composition of commercial HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages
TLDR
Using verified analytical methodology for HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages, this study confirmed the hypothesis that fructose as a percentage of total sugars is in close agreement with published specifications in industry technical data sheets, published literature values and governmental standards and requirements.
Determination of Sugar Profiles of Sweetened Foods and Beverages
The determination of sugar profile in commonly consumed sweetened foods and beverages (cake, chocolate, jelly tots, cookie, wafer, pudding, fruit yogurt, limon-flavored soda, cola, lemonade, mineral
Laboratory analysis of glucose, fructose, and sucrose contents in Japanese common beverages for the exact assessment of beverage-derived sugar intake
TLDR
It is indicated that actual sugar content in Japanese common beverages is necessary for the exact assessment of beverage-derived sugar intake.
Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on children.
TLDR
The modulation of obesity and cardiometabolic disease risk factors is of paramount importance from a public health standpoint; reducing the consumption of SSBs is a great place to start.
High-Fructose Corn Syrup Use in Beverages: Composition, Manufacturing, Properties, Consumption, and Health Effects
TLDR
High-fructose corn syrup has been used in beverages for more than 30 years and has been a safe and reliable sweetener for the beverage industry, but that changed in 2004, with the publication of a commentary promoting the hypothesis that HFCS-sweetened beverages held significant and unique responsibility for the current obesity epidemic.
Are Fruit Juices Healthier Than Sugar-Sweetened Beverages? A Review
TLDR
It is determined that, despite the similarity of fruits juices to sugar-sweetened beverages in terms of free sugars content, it remains unclear whether they lead to the same metabolic consequences if consumed in equal dose.
Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children
TLDR
This work determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts and found that 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 REFERENCES
High-fructose corn syrup: is this what's for dinner?
TLDR
Although increased intake of calories from HFCS is important to examine, the health effect of overall trends in added caloric sweeteners should not be overlooked.
Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity.
TLDR
The increase in consumption of HFCS has a temporal relation to the epidemic of obesity, and the overconsumption of H FCS in calorically sweetened beverages may play a role in the epidemic.
Straight talk about high-fructose corn syrup: what it is and what it ain't.
  • John S. White
  • Biology
    The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 2008
TLDR
The history, composition, availability, and characteristics of HFCS are reviewed in a factual manner to clarify common misunderstandings that have been a source of confusion to health professionals and the general public alike.
Endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming beverages sweetened with fructose, glucose, sucrose, or high-fructose corn syrup.
TLDR
It is shown that consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages substantially increases postprandial triacylglycerol concentrations compared with glucose- sweetened beverages, and apolipoprotein B concentrations were also increased in subjects consuming fructose, but not in those consuming glucose.
Adverse effects of dietary fructose.
  • A. Gaby
  • Medicine
    Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic
  • 2005
TLDR
Fructose is a potent reducing sugar that promotes the formation of toxic advanced glycation end-products, which appear to play a role in the aging process; in the pathogenesis of the vascular, renal, and ocular complications of diabetes; and in the development of atherosclerosis.
How bad is fructose?
  • G. Bray
  • Medicine
    The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 2007
TLDR
The intake of dietary fructose has increased significantly from 1970 to 2000, and there has been a 25% increase in available “added sugars” during this period, which could aggravate health concerns with fructose.
Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.
TLDR
The weight of epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates that a greater consumption of SSBs is associated with weight gain and obesity, and sufficient evidence exists for public health strategies to discourage consumption of sugary drinks as part of a healthy lifestyle.
Endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages with meals in obese men and women: influence of insulin resistance on plasma triglyceride responses.
TLDR
In obese subjects, consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages with meals was associated with less insulin secretion, blunted diurnal leptin profiles, and increased postprandial TG concentrations compared with glucose consumption, suggesting that fructose consumption may exacerbate an already adverse metabolic profile present in many obese subjects.
Manufacturing, composition, and applications of fructose.
TLDR
High-fructose syrups comprise fructose, dextrose, and minor amounts of oligosaccharides and are used extensively in carbonated beverages, baked goods, canned fruits, jams and jellies, and dairy products.
Metabolic effects of fructose and the worldwide increase in obesity.
TLDR
Although there is compelling evidence that very high fructose intake can have deleterious metabolic effects in humans as in rodents, the role of fructose in the development of the current epidemic of metabolic disorders remains controversial.
...
1
2
3
4
...