Sucrose avoidance by American robins (Turdus migratorius): Implications for control of bird damage in fruit crops

@article{Brugger1991SucroseAB,
  title={Sucrose avoidance by American robins (Turdus migratorius): Implications for control of bird damage in fruit crops},
  author={Kristin E. Brugger and Curtis O. Nelms},
  journal={Crop Protection},
  year={1991},
  volume={10},
  pages={455-460}
}

Sucrose Repellency to European Starlings: Will High-Sucrose Cultivars Deter Bird Damage to Fruit?

It is suggested that the presence of digestible nutrients mitigates the effect of sucrose in sucrase-deficient birds and that a fruit cultivar would require @> 11.25% sucrose to repel starlings.

Preferences and apparent digestibilities of sugars by fruit damaging birds in Japan

Increasing sucrose contents of commercial fruits may deter sucrase-deficient birds such as gray starlings from depredating fruits, but it may also lead to increased crop damage by species such as the azure-winged magpie and brown-eared bulbul which may have to consume more of the less digestible fruit in order to meet their energy requirements.

Sucrose as a Feeding Deterrent for Fruit-Eating Birds

It is suggested that major bird species, such as American robins and European starlings, will avoid eating high-sucrose fruits in an agricultural setting provided that sucrose concentration in these fruits is sufficiently high, there is alternate food available, and high-aided fruits are planted in relatively large stands.

Nectar concentration affects sugar preferences in two Australian honeyeaters and a lorikeet

A switch from Hexose preference on dilute diets to sucrose preference on concentrated diets has now been shown for hummingbirds, flowerpiercers, sunbirds, honeyeaters and lorikeets, suggesting that the switch from hexose preference may be directly related to the digestive capacity of different taxa.

Differences in sucrose metabolism relative to accumulation of bird-deterrent sucrose levels in fruits of wild and domestic Vaccinium species

The extent of sucrose accumulation in fruits and the degree of variability for this trait among Vaccinium species support the feasibility of developing high sucrose fruits, which would be a potentially valuable addition to current strategies of minimizing crop losses to birds.

Sugar preferences and digestive efficiency of the village weaver: a generalist avian pollinator of African plants

Results indicate that hexose preferences in generalist avian nectarivores may help explain the low sucrose content in flowers pollinated by these birds.

COLOR, SIZE, AND LOCATION OF ARTIFICIAL FRUITS AFFECT SUCROSE AVOIDANCE BY CEDAR WAXWINGS AND EUROPEAN STARLINGS

At the level tested, sucrose was a strong associative repellent for starlings, probably because of induced postingestional distress due to their inability to digest sucrose, but waxwings appear unable to maintain positive energy balance feeding solely on high-sucrose fruits.

SUCROSE INTOLERANCE IN BIRDS: SIMPLE NONLETHAL DIAGNOSTIC METHODS AND CONSEQUENCES FOR ASSIMILATION OF COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATES

The results support the hypothesis that sucrose intolerance is a shared-derived character of the monophyletic lineage that in- cludes starlings, mimids, and thrushes, and indicate that Sucrose intolerance in birds can be easily diagnosed with a combination of behavioral and nonlethal physiological measure- ments.

EVALUATION OF METHYL ANTHRANILATE AS A BIRD REPELLENT FRUIT CROPS

: Methyl anthranilate (MA) is a grape-flavored food additive that is aversive to birds. Previous studies had indicated that anthranilates can deter frugivorous birds but that anthranilates are

Disaccharide Intolerance Of European Starlings

The use of disaccharides to discourage bird depredation to agricultural crops has elicited some interest during the last few years. Data developed in these trials indicate that several avian species

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 19 REFERENCES

Color Preferences of Frugivorous Birds in Relation to the Colors of Fleshy Fruits

It is suggested hat avian color preferences may not provide strong selection favoring the evolution of the common fruit colors, and that the frequency distribution of fruit hues is best explained in other ways.

Physiological Basis and Ecological Consequences of Sugar Preferences in Cedar Waxwings

It is concluded that the preferences for simple sugars appear to be determined by the complex interaction between digestive constraints, postingestional effects, and taste.

STATUS OF MESUROL® AS A BIRD REPELLENT FOR CHERRIES AND OTHER FRUIT CROPS

A single application of Mesurol at 1.5 Ib (Al) /ac to ripening cherries reduced bird damage in a field test in the mid-Hudson Valley of New York, 1986, and support the various evaluations over the past 15 years of Mesurl as a bird repellent for fruit crops.

SUGAR-TASTING ABILITY AND FRUIT SELECTION IN TROPICAL FRUIT-EATING BIRDS

The sugar-tasting abilities of four species of tanagers and two species of man- akins were tested. Three tanager species were able to detect differences in diets containing 8%, 10%, and 12% sugar. In

Physiological constraint on feeding behavior: intestinal membrane disaccharidases of the starling.

European starlings preferred mixture solutions of D-glucose plus D-fructose to equimolar (double molar caloric value) solutions of sucrose, suggesting a role for intestinal enzymes in the coevolutionary interactions between vertebrates and their plant food sources.

Digestive System Trade-offs and Adaptations of Frugivorous Passerine Birds

It appears that the anatomy and physiology of fruit eaters result in less than complete digestion and absorption of sugars, which may lie in the ability of frugivores to process large amounts of fruitper unit time in spite of the constraint gut volume might place on fruit intake.

Digestive Responses of Temperate Birds Switched to Fruit or Insect Diets

American Robins and European Starlings were presented with crickets or three species of wild fruits for 3- to 10-day feeding trials and their diets were examined to examine phenotypic adaptations of birds to different diets.

BIRD DAMAGE TO TART CHERRIES IN MICHIGAN, 1972

Bird damage to commercial fruits has long been a problem in many coun- tries, but the true magnitude of the damage incurred is difficult to determine objectively. Often the opinions of fruit growers

Dietary, Phylogenetic, and Ecological Correlates of Intestinal Sucrase and Maltase Activity in Birds

  • C. M. Rio
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Physiological Zoology
  • 1990
Intestinal sucrase and maltase activities were measured in three species of hummingbirds and 11 species of passerine birds from western Mexico and found that Hummingbirds and passerines differed in the relationship between maltase and suCrase activities.