Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns

@article{Blass1999SucklingAS,
  title={Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns},
  author={Elliott M. Blass and Lisa B Watt},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={1999},
  volume={83},
  pages={611-623}
}
Efficacy of Oral Sucrose in Infants of Methadone-Maintained Mothers
TLDR
This study found no differences in the pain responses of ME infants and non-exposed infants when given sucrose during heel lance procedures.
Non Pharmacological Analgesia for Newborns
TLDR
It emerges from this review that certain strategies can be combined with oral sucrose and non-nutritional sucking to provide effective and almost complete analgesia for acute pain in neonates.
Analgesic effects of maternal breast milk and sucrose in early, full, and late-term neonates
TLDR
Breastfeeding and sucrose are equally effective as non-pharmacological analgesics during metabolic screening in early-, full-, and late-term neonates.
Warmth is analgesic in healthy newborns
Using non-nutritive sucking and oral glucose solution with neonates to relieve pain: a randomised controlled trial.
TLDR
Nurses can use a pain assessment tool and the pain-relief intervention to improve the quality of neonatal care in clinical practice and indicate that either non-nutritive sucking or glucose solution can effectively decrease the level of pain.
Mechanisms of sucrose and non-nutritive sucking in procedural pain management in infants.
TLDR
There is sufficient evidence to support the efficacy of combining the two interventions for procedural pain relief in infants, separately and in combination for relieving procedural pain in preterm and full term infants.
Effectiveness of sucrose analgesia in newborns undergoing painful medical procedures
TLDR
A modest reduction of pain is found in newborns of both diabetic and nondiabetic mothers when sucrose was used for all medical procedures performed in the first 2 days after birth, but when each procedure was analyzed separately, it was found that the effectiveness of Sucrose was limited to venipuncture for the newborn screening test.
Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures.
TLDR
The efficacy, effect of dose, method of administration and safety of sucrose for relieving procedural pain in neonates as assessed by validated composite pain scores, physiological pain indicators, and behavioural pain indicators are determined.
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TLDR
The flat dose-response function extends findings in rats and humans that the calming and pain-reducing effects of sucrose are not influenced by either concentration or volume, suggesting that the transduction from gustatory afferent to opioid-mediated efferent is of an on-off nature and not graded.
Milk-induced hypoalgesia in human newborns.
OBJECTIVE To determine whether milk and its components reduce crying in newborns during and after blood collection for phenylketonuria evaluation. METHODOLOGY Seventy-two normal newborns ingested 2
Sucrose Reduces Pain Reaction to Heel Lancing in Preterm Infants: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized and Masked Study
TLDR
It is concluded that sucrose administered orally before a heel lance reduces the pain reaction in preterm infants and response of cerebral blood volume to pain does not seem to be altered by sucrose.
Sucrose as an analgesic for newborn infants.
TLDR
These findings, which parallel results obtained in studies of pain in infant rats, provide a potent yet simple, benign intervention to help alleviate stress and pain routinely experienced by human infants.
Reduction of pain response in premature infants using intraoral sucrose.
TLDR
There was a significant reduction in the duration of first cry, the percentage of time spent crying in the 5 minutes after heel prick, and the pain score in the sucrose treated group.
Analgesia in newborns given oral glucose
TLDR
It is strongly suggested that 1 ml of a 30% glucose solution given orally alleviates mild pain significantly and can be used for this purpose in newborns.
Suckling and sucrose ingestion suppress persistent hyperalgesia and spinal Fos expression after forepaw inflammation in infant rats.
TLDR
The development of persistent pain and hyperalgesia in 10-day-old rats that can be attenuated by endogenous pain-modulating systems activated by taste and nonnutritive suckling is demonstrated and new clinical approaches for engaging endogenous analgesic mechanisms in infants following tissue injury and inflammation are provided.
Pacifying effects of nonnutritive sucking on term and preterm neonates during heelstick procedures.
TLDR
It is suggested that nonnutritive sucking during heelstick procedures may attenuate behavioral distress in all neonates and physiologic arousal in neonates with less severe postnatal complications.
Oral sweet solution reduces pain‐related behaviour in preterm infants
TLDR
To evaluate the effectiveness of oral sucrose in the prevention of pain‐induced crying in preterm infants, a sample of 28 healthy neonates who were having routine blood drawn by arm venipuncture was studied.
The effects of a pacifying stimulus on behavioral and adrenocortical responses to circumcision in the newborn.
TLDR
There was evidence that the neonatal adrenocortical system was sensitive to variations in surgical procedures, and Elevations of serum cortisol predicted average behavioral state following circumcision, whereas crying during circumcision did not.
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