Successful use of a 20% lipid emulsion to resuscitate a patient after a presumed bupivacaine-related cardiac arrest.

@article{Rosenblatt2006SuccessfulUO,
  title={Successful use of a 20% lipid emulsion to resuscitate a patient after a presumed bupivacaine-related cardiac arrest.},
  author={Meg A. Rosenblatt and Mark Richard Abel and Gregory W. Fischer and Chad J Itzkovich and James B. Eisenkraft},
  journal={Anesthesiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={105 1},
  pages={
          217-8
        }
}
  • Meg A. Rosenblatt, Mark Richard Abel, +2 authors James B. Eisenkraft
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine
  • Anesthesiology
  • The patient was a 58-yr-old, 82-kg, 170-cm male who presented for arthroscopic repair of a torn rotator cuff in the right shoulder. His medical history was significant for coronary artery bypass graft surgery at age 43 yr. He gave a history of angina upon exertion and occasionally at rest. He declined further preoperative cardiac workup but was considered by his cardiologist to be stable on medical therapy. This included nitroglycerine as needed, lisinopril, atenolol isosorbide mononitrate, and… CONTINUE READING

    Paper Mentions

    INTERVENTIONAL CLINICAL TRIAL
    The aim of this study is to investigate whether intravenous lipid emulsion is effective in attenuating the clinical effects of a cardioactive drug, exemplified by the beta-blocking… Expand
    ConditionsBlood Pressure, Drug Overdose, Overdose of Beta-adrenergic Blocking Drug
    InterventionDrug

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