Successful oral doxycycline treatment of Lyme disease-associated facial palsy and meningitis.

@article{Dotevall1999SuccessfulOD,
  title={Successful oral doxycycline treatment of Lyme disease-associated facial palsy and meningitis.},
  author={Leif Dotevall and Lars Hagberg},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={1999},
  volume={28 3},
  pages={
          569-74
        }
}
  • L. DotevallL. Hagberg
  • Published 1 March 1999
  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Twenty-nine patients, aged 11-79 years (mean, 50 years), with Lyme neuroborreliosis, facial nerve palsy, and meningitis were treated with oral doxycycline (daily dose, 200-400 mg) for 9-17 days in a prospective, nonrandomized study. Facial paresis was bilateral in eight (28%) of the 29 patients. Twenty-six patients (90%) recovered without sequelae within 6 months, while three of the patients with bilateral facial palsy at admission had remaining paresis at follow-up. In five patients… 

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SHOULD LYME DISEASE AFFECTING THE NERVOUS SYSTEM BE TREATED WITH ORAL OR INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTICS?

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...

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