Successful establishment of Wolbachia in Aedes populations to suppress dengue transmission

@article{Hoffmann2011SuccessfulEO,
  title={Successful establishment of Wolbachia in Aedes populations to suppress dengue transmission},
  author={Ary Anthony Hoffmann and Brian L. Montgomery and Jean Popovici and I{\~n}aki Iturbe-Ormaetxe and P. H. Johnson and Frederico Muzzi and Melinda Greenfield and Meave Durkan and Yi San Leong and Y. Dong and Helen Cook and Jason K. Axford and Ashley G. Callahan and Nichola Kenny and C. Omodei and Elizabeth A. McGraw and Peter A. Ryan and Scott A Ritchie and Michael Turelli and Scott L O'Neill},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={476},
  pages={454-457}
}
Genetic manipulations of insect populations for pest control have been advocated for some time, but there are few cases where manipulated individuals have been released in the field and no cases where they have successfully invaded target populations. Population transformation using the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia is particularly attractive because this maternally-inherited agent provides a powerful mechanism to invade natural populations through cytoplasmic incompatibility. When… Expand
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