Successful conservation of global waterbird populations depends on effective governance

@article{Amano2018SuccessfulCO,
  title={Successful conservation of global waterbird populations depends on effective governance},
  author={Tatsuya Amano and Tam{\'a}s Sz{\'e}kely and Brody Sandel and Szabolcs Nagy and Taej Mundkur and Tom Langendoen and Daniel E. Blanco and Candan u. Soykan and William J. Sutherland},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2018},
  volume={553},
  pages={199-202}
}
Understanding global patterns of biodiversity change is crucial for conservation research, policies and practices. However, for most ecosystems, the lack of systematically collected data at a global level limits our understanding of biodiversity changes and their local-scale drivers. Here we address this challenge by focusing on wetlands, which are among the most biodiverse and productive of any environments and which provide essential ecosystem services, but are also amongst the most seriously… Expand
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