Success of the modified epley maneuver in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

@article{Wolf1999SuccessOT,
  title={Success of the modified epley maneuver in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo},
  author={Jeffrey S Wolf and Kestutis Paul Boyev and Brenda J. Manokey and Douglas E. Mattox},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={1999},
  volume={109}
}
Objective: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPFV) is a common condition seen by otolaryngologists. The purpose of this study is to determine the ability of the modified Epley maneuver to treat BPPV. Study Design: Retrospective review. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 107 patients diagnosed with BPPV at our institution between March of 1993 and June of 1995. Each patient was diagnosed with isolated BPPV by history and Hallpike‐Dix maneuver. There were no other vestibular symptoms or… 
SUCCESS OF THE MODIFIED EPLEY MANEUVER IN BENINGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO
TLDR
The Modified Epley Maneuver is a safe and cost effective treatment modality for BPPV and it can be easily performed as an office based procedure.
Efficacy of the Semont maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
TLDR
The Semont maneuver demonstrated a 90.3% cure rate after a maximum of 4 sessions, and patients consulting late (>6 months after the beginning of symptoms) or having traumatic BPPV had lower recovery rates than patients without these factors.
Is it important to repeat the positioning maneuver after the treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?
TLDR
The study shows that doing the retest after repositioning maneuver of particles in BPPV is effectual, since it has high specificity.
Effect of a hybrid maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the Gans repositioning maneuver (GRM) as a new treatment is effective in treating PC-BPPV with no benefits to postmaneuver restrictions.
Manobras de reposicionamento no tratamento da vertigem paroxística posicional benigna
TLDR
The repositioning maneuver of Epley is an excellent treatment for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and most of the patients of the series were successfuly treated by this method.
Number of maneuvers need to get a negative Dix-Hallpike test.
TLDR
The number of modified Epley maneuvers is variable depending on the etiology, being that the Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo secondary to the traumatic brain injury needed a greater number of maneuvers for Dix-Hallpike test to become negative.
Clinical Features of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Western Turkey
Background: It was the aim of this study to analyze the clinical manifestations, the incidence of each variant and the comorbid conditions of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) as well as
Treatment of Patients With Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Severe Immobility Using the Particle Repositioning Chair: A Retrospective Cohort Study
TLDR
Successful treatment of patients with BPPV and concomitant immobility prohibiting traditional CRMs is reported using a particle repositioning chair (PRC), an indication for treatment with a PRC if available.
Achados na vestibulometria de pacientes com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna submetidos à Manobra de Epley
TLDR
The Epley’s maneuver was considered effective in the BPPV treatment, abolishing the symptoms and signs after a unique maneuver in most of the cases and no relationship was observed between the therapeutic results and electronystagmographic results.
Benign Positional Vertigo: Prognostic Factors
  • Maria Guerra Del Rio, M. Arriaga
  • Medicine
    Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • 2004
TLDR
Endolymphatic hydrops and central nervous system-related dizziness as cofactors with BPPV were associated with the highest recurrence rates, and prior trauma or labyrinthitis was found to predict the lowest initial CRP success.
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Evaluating the effectiveness of the Semont's liberatory maneuver in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo stemming from lithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal found that a full 62% of the patients treated were freed of the disorder after a single maneuver and 95.5% after 3 treatments.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure support an alternative theory that the densities that impart gravity-sensitivity to a semicircular canal in BPPV are free in the canal, rather than attached to the cupula.
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TLDR
The authors feel the vestibular "barbecue" rehabilitation techniques suggested by Lempert--i.e. a 270 degrees rotation starting from the decubitus position on the pathological side, rather than Baloh's traditional 360 degrees rotation--is most suitable for the treatment of BPPV stemming from lateral canalolithiasis.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Sixty-six patients with the symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were treated by challenging them with the precipitating head positions on a repeated and serial basis and one patient whose condition did not respond was found to have a perilymphatic fistula that mimicked BPPV.
Comparison of the canalith repositioning procedure and vestibular habituation training in forty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
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TLDR
The canalith repositioning procedure seemed to give resolution of symptoms with fewer treatments, but long-term results show either treatment approach is effective in relieving positional vertigo.
Randomized trial of the canalith repositioning procedure.
TLDR
Thirty-six subjects with confirmed, unilateral benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo of at least 2 months' duration were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups and found that those who received the canalith repositioning procedure had significantly more negative responses than did those in the placebo group.
Posterior Semicircular Canal Occlusion for Intractable Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
This work describes two patients with intractable BPPV and profound sensorineural hearing loss in the affected ear treated by transmastoid posterior semicircular canal occlusion, and feels this new procedure provides a simpler and possibly safer alternative to singular neurectomy and should be given future consideration in the treatment of intractables BPPVs in a normal-hearing ear.
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