Success of reproduction in pikas, Ochotona princeps (Richardson).

@article{Millar1974SuccessOR,
  title={Success of reproduction in pikas, Ochotona princeps (Richardson).},
  author={John S Millar},
  journal={Journal of mammalogy},
  year={1974},
  volume={55 3},
  pages={
          527-42
        }
}
  • J. Millar
  • Published 20 August 1974
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of mammalogy
Reproductive parameters of the pika, Ochotona princeps ( Richard-son), were documented from 1968 to 1970 in southwestern Alberta to determine the pattern and extent of reproductive losses and the role of food, weather, and population density in causing these losses. All animals matured as yearlings and had potential to produce two litters of two to four young each breeding season. In females successful in producing at least one offspring, mean ovulation rate, preimplantation losses… 

EVOLUTION OF LITTER‐SIZE IN THE PIKA, OCHOTONA PRINCEPS (RICHARDSON)

  • J. Millar
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1973
TLDR
During a study of the pika Ochotona princeps (Richardson) in southwestern Alberta, data on reproduction, mortality, and population density were obtained and these data are used to evaluate the significance of litter-size in pikas.

Interannual Variation in Timing of Parturition and Growth of Collared Pikas (Ochotona collaris) in the Southwest Yukon1

TLDR
Growth rates and timing of parturition of collared pikas from 1995–2002 in the Ruby Range, Yukon Territory, Canada, are examined, suggesting that pikAs are able to adjust to seasonal uncertainty associated with highly variable spring conditions.

American Pika (Ochotona princeps) Population Survival in Winters with Low or No Snowpack

TLDR
Contrary to the low snowfall-high mortality prediction, there was no evidence that the nearly total lack of snow caused unusual overwinter mortality in Sierra Nevada pikas.

Effects of a late snowstorm and rain on survival and reproductive success in Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus)

TLDR
Body mass changes, reproductive success, and mortality were studied in Columbian ground squirrels in southern Alberta from 1994 to 1996, and it was predicted that adverse weather conditions during the mating season in general, and this snowstorm specifically, would influence reproductive success and survival.

Demographic analysis of a declining pika Ochotona collaris population: linking survival to broad-scale climate patterns via spring snowmelt patterns.

TLDR
The PDO was negatively correlated to the timing of spring snowmelt at the site, implicating the importance of earlier spring conditions and plant phenology on the subsequent winter survival of adults and therefore, population growth.

Colonization in a pika population: dispersal vs philopatry

TLDR
Relative tendencies toward dispersal or philopatry in a marked population of alpine mammals, the pika (Ochotona princeps), were investigated over a 3-year period in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to help understand their low intrapopulation genetic variability.

Reproduction and Breeding Biology of Indian Pika; Ochotona roylei (Lagomorpha) from Tungnath Garhwal Himalaya India

TLDR
It is found that very few Indian Pika survived at the studied population for the three years of the study in their natural habitat.

The Function of Haypiles of Pikas (Ochotona princeps)

The pika, Ochotona princeps , spends a considerable amount of time during summer caching vegetation. These caches (haypiles) have been suggested to function as the mainstay of diet in winter, as a

Habitat characteristics and life history explain reproductive seasonality in lagomorphs

TLDR
The present study applies both a categorical description and a quantitative measure to summarize the degree of birth seasonality in the wild of 69 lagomorph species, finding that Leporid species with shorter breeding seasons force maternal resources into few large litters to maximise reproductive output while circumstances are favourable.

Spatial Relationships and Social Organization in Adult Pikas: A Facultatively Monogamous Mammal

TLDR
Adult spatial relationships and social organization in a marked population of alpine mammals, the pika, were studied over a 3-year period in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, finding that males can neither monopolize essential resources sufficiently to attract several females, nor defend groups of females as social repulsion among females further increases their dispersion.