Corpus ID: 6115481

Success Exponent of Wiretapper: A Tradeoff between Secrecy and Reliability

@article{Chan2008SuccessEO,
  title={Success Exponent of Wiretapper: A Tradeoff between Secrecy and Reliability},
  author={Chung Chan},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2008},
  volume={abs/0805.3605}
}
  • Chung Chan
  • Published 2008
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
  • ArXiv
  • Equivocation rate has been widely used as an information-theoretic measure of security after Shannon[10]. It simplifies problems by removing the effect of atypical behavior from the system. In [9], however, Merhav and Arikan considered the alternative of using guessing exponent to analyze the Shannon's cipher system. Because guessing exponent captures the atypical behavior, the strongest expressible notion of secrecy requires the more stringent condition that the size of the key, instead of its… CONTINUE READING
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