Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

@article{Sluijs2006SubtropicalAO,
  title={Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum},
  author={Appy Sluijs and Stefan Schouten and Mark Pagani and Martijn Woltering and Henk Brinkhuis and Jaap S. Sinninghe Damst{\'e} and Gerald R. Dickens and Matthew Huber and Gert‐Jan Reichart and Ruediger Stein and Jens Matthiessen and Lucas J. Lourens and Nikolai Pedentchouk and Jan Backman and Kathryn Moran},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={441},
  pages={610-613}
}
The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ∼55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We… 
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Palaeogene sediments obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition are analysed, showing that large quantities of the free-floating fern Azolla grew and reproduced in the Arctic Ocean by the onset of the middle Eocene epoch and that onset and termination of the Azolla phase depended on the degree of oceanic exchange between Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.
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