Subterranean phylogeography of freshwater crayfishes shows extensive gene flow and surprisingly large population sizes

@article{Buhay2005SubterraneanPO,
  title={Subterranean phylogeography of freshwater crayfishes shows extensive gene flow and surprisingly large population sizes},
  author={J. E. Buhay and K. Crandall},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={14}
}
Subterranean animals are currently viewed as highly imperiled, precariously avoiding extinction in an extreme environment of darkness. This assumption is based on a hypothesis that the reduction in visual systems and morphology common in cave faunas reflects a genetic inability to adapt and persist coupled with the perception of a habitat that is limited, disconnected, and fragile. Accordingly, 95% of cave fauna in the United States are presumed endangered due to surface environmental… Expand
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