Subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).

@article{Zhang2009SubsurfaceOF,
  title={Subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).},
  author={Feng Zhang and Ken Sautter and Robert C. Davis and Matthew R. Linford},
  journal={Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids},
  year={2009},
  volume={25 3},
  pages={
          1289-91
        }
}
Here we present a straightforward patterning technique for silicon: subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS). In this method, a stencil mask is placed above a silicon surface. Radio-frequency plasma oxidation of the substrate creates a pattern of thicker oxide in the exposed regions. Etching with HF or KOH produces very shallow or much higher aspect ratio features on silicon, respectively, where patterning is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and… 
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