Subsociality and female reproductive success in a mycophagous thrips: An observational and experimental analysis

@article{Crespi2005SubsocialityAF,
  title={Subsociality and female reproductive success in a mycophagous thrips: An observational and experimental analysis},
  author={Bernard J. Crespi},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={3},
  pages={61-74}
}
  • B. Crespi
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Journal of Insect Behavior
Oviparous females of the haplodiploid, facultatively viviparous thrips Elaphrothrips tuberculatus(Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) guard their eggs against female conspecifics and other egg predators. The intensity of maternal defense increases with clutch size. Field and laboratory observations indicate that cannibalism by females is an important selective pressure favoring maternal care. Experimental removals of guarding females showed that egg guarding substantially increases egg survivorship… 

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